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FISH IN THE DESERT ?

That sounds suspiciously fishy, doesn’t it

Several early explorers of the Australian interior (and sadly in recent years some tourists as well) have lost their lives there, because they were unable to satisfy their need of fluid intake and died of thirst and dehydration. The Australian desert is dry, hot, and treeless and yet reports from as far ago as 1845 by Eyre and 1861 by Burke and Willis state that Central Australian Aborigines caught fishes and had names for them – in the desert! So, what kinds of fish could possibly survive in the desert? Well, along tropical seashores one can meet the so-called mud skippers, a group of fishes that hop along tidal flats, the sandy beach or may even climb onto the lower branches of mangrove trees in search of food, like insects, spiders, and worms perhaps that they consume on land. Eels, too, are known to be able to survive out on land especially when in wet grass for some days. Even some catfish have been reported to survive for a while out of water. However, none of that applies to the Australian desert species. —>—>

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Pearl Mussels in Peril

Is there any help for pearl mussels?

We hear and read so much about plants and animal species being threatened by extinction, but not all species make headlines, like for instance the freshwater pearl mussel with the beautiful name Margaritifera margaritifera. Not only oysters and other marine molluscs produce pearls: the freshwater pearl mussel of the holarctic region on both sides of the Atlantic has for centuries yielded valuable wild pearls, too. But the times when these bog mussels were literally plastering the beds of fast flowing streams of areas poor in nutrients and calcium are nearly over – and that despite the fact that this animal can probably reach an age of 200 or even more years. —>—>

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Progress to Roam Around more Freely

But even in fish it has its price

Have you ever had this feeling that you were really hungry or thirsty and needed to eat or drink something, but you were too exhausted (or let’s put it bluntly: too lazy) to get up and go to the shop? Getting up, putting on your coat, walking to the shop, etc., all that takes time and would, of course, also have required extra energy. The decision as to whether to stay at home or to go out procuring food is one that animals have to make all the time . —>