biology zoology blog benno meyer rochow centrestage for earthworms

Centrestage for earthworms

The great Charles Darwin had a weakness for earthworms. On and off for 40 years he studied these creatures, observed, measured, and counted them and is known to have played his bassoon to them to determine if they were deaf. In 1881 he finally published his earthworm results in a book, in which, perhaps surprisingly, he even credited earthworms with intelligence and benevolence. —>—>

biology zoology blog benno meyer rochow sunglasses birds

Internal Sunglasses

Some birds appear to have sunglasses

Although I myself did not have to wear glasses (except perhaps sunglasses) until I turned 55, millions of people on Earth may view this simple ‘tool’ to improve the resolving power of their eyes as one of the greatest inventions ever made. Photographers, microscopists, and opticians can tell you that the aperture of an optical system not only controls the amount of light admitted (and thus the brightness of the image you see) but also the resolving power of the system. —>—>

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Head- and Brainless

Is learning something then still possible?

I love the questions that children have. Why isn’t the sun alive? What would happen if we had eyes also on the back of our head, like spiders? And, can we live without a brain?

Well, occasionally anencephalic children are born and they lack almost the entire brain. Few live longer than a few days after birth, but there is a case of an anencephalic infant having been kept alive for almost 3 years. And there is the famous legend of the 15th-century pirate Klaus Störtebeker, who was captured to be beheaded along with his crew. According to the legend, he struck a deal with the executioner that those men of his crew that he’d run past, after being decapitated, should get their freedom. And how many men did the headless Störtebeker then pass in order to save them: 11 according to the legend. —>—>