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You Hate Something?

So how about the animals: do they hate something too?

Somebody recently told me a vulgar joke about why cats hate dogs and dogs hate cats, but since I hate vulgarity I neither found the joke funny nor will I retell it. However, what the joke did, was to make me think whether animals can indeed hate and express such an emotion usually associated with human behaviour. Obviously, animals can express affection: the cat rubbing its head against your leg (or another cat’s head), dogs licking your hand, baby mice snuggling up to their mother and even a tame koi carp turning on its side to have its belly scratched. But is that love and if it is, is there also the opposite, namely hate? —>

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The Third Eye Comes First

But where is the third eye and what does it do?

My colleague swears by melatonin for alleviating jet lag and recommended I take a dose before departing on a flight across several time zones. The French 17th century philosopher and mathematician Rene Descartes was convinced he had at last found it: the soul. Hindi and Jain women wear a “bindi” (a small red spot on the forehead between their eyes) as a “third eye” to fend off evil (and to look pretty). What do these three statements have to do with each other? Well, we shall see. The organ Descartes regarded as the soul was the “pineal”, also called “epiphysis” – a tiny appendage on the upper side of the brain, located between fore- and midbrain. Though we no longer believe it is the seat of the soul, we still don’t have all the answers regarding its function. In humans and other mammals this small glandular structure appears to be involved in suppressing the maturation of the sex organs, for a pineal tumour or the surgical removal of the structure can result in precocious puberty. —>

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Nose Blowing

And other strange sounds

Sounds accompany many kinds of activities. The buzz of a mosquito in the bedroom comes to mind; and then there is the clashing of horns of mountain sheep in combat, the chewing of food, the knock on the door, sounds in courtship, territorial claims in birds, monkeys and other animals. etc. Come to think of it there aren’t really terribly many animals that are totally silent; worms perhaps and, with very few exceptions, spiders, but certainly not fish. —>